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Contact our Tech Support Department with your questions and concerns.
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1.800.663.9700
Or fill out this form and one of our Tech Support Representatives will get back to you as soon as possible.

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1.
Can I buy direct from Power Source Canada?
If you do not have an account with us we do not sell direct to the public please contact a dealer by referring to “Where can I find my closest dealer?”.
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2.
Who do I speak with for technical information?
Please contact a dealer by referring to “Where can I find my closest dealer?”.
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3.
How do I get pricing and availability?
Please contact a dealer by referring to “Where can I find my closest dealer?”.
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4.
Who do I speak with regarding a warranty situation?
Please contact a dealer by referring to “Where can I find my closest dealer?”.
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5.
Where can I find my closest dealer?

Homlite
http://www.homelite.com/service_support/service_center_locator

Ridgid
Pick you type of tool then key in your location
http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/Technical-Services/index.htm

Ryobi
http://www.ryobitools.com/support/service_center_locators

Snapper
https://www.snapper.com/na/en_us/support/dealer-locator/find-us-and-canada-dealers.html

Simplicity
http://www.simplicitymfg.com/us/en/support/dealer-locator

Ferris
http://www.ferrismowers.com/us/en/support/dealer-locator

For Briggs and Stratton Engines, pressure washers, portable generators Home Standby Systems.
Use link below Select Country then enter postal code And km’s
http://www.briggsandstratton.com/us/en/support/dealerlocator

Hydro Gear
Call ph.1-800-663-9700

Baja
Call ph.1-800-663-9700

Speeco
Call ph.1-800-663-9700

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6.
Recommended oil in small engines? Summer / Winter?
Oil Recommendation:
  • SAE 30 40° F and higher (5° C and higher) is good for all purpose use above 40° F, use below 40° F will cause hard starting.
  • 10W-30 0 to 100° F (-18 to 38° C) is better for varying temperature conditions. This grade of oil improves cold weather starting, but may increase oil consumption at 80° F(27° C) or higher.
  • Synthetic 5W-30 -20 to 120° F (-30 to 40° C) provides the best protection at all temperatures as well as improved starting with less oil consumption.
  • 5W-30 40° F and below (5° C and below) is recommended for winter use, and works best in cold conditions.
Type of oil to use:
  • Use a high quality detergent oil classified "For Service SF, SG, SH, SJ" or higher.
  • Do not use special additives.
  • Choose a viscosity according to the table above.
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7.
Where can I get information on the Generators you sell?
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8.
What web sites can you recommend I visit for additional information about the Lawn and Garden industry?
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9.
How much oil does my Briggs and Stratton engine need?

Engine oil capacity is dependant on your specific engine model. To determine your engine's oil capacity, please visit our Oil Capacity PDF.

Oil level checking and changing intervals are available on our Tune-Up Schedule page.

The "Oil" section of your Operator's Manual also contains this information.

For your convenience, Do-It-Yourself parts and products, such as Briggs & Stratton Lawnmower Oil, can be purchased through the Maintenance Products & Accessories section of our website.

Your best source of information regarding any engine concern would be a Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer. Your Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer has all the information relating to Briggs & Stratton warranty information, replacement engines, short blocks, parts, pricing, service/repair, specifications, etc.

For your convenience, we offer three easy ways to locate your nearest Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealers:

Use our website's Service Center Locator.

Visit www.yellowpages.com and enter "Lawn Mowers" or "Engines-Gasoline" in the Category search field and your Postal Code in the Location search field.

Call the Briggs & Stratton Automated Hotline at (800) 444-7774. This hotline is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week and features voice recognition technology to assist you in finding the Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealers in your area. Automated maintenance tips, product information, and FAQs are also offered through voice activated menus.

For information regarding the type of oil to use in your engine, please visit our Oil Recommendations FAQ.

Please read and abide by any applicable Safety Information contained in your engine Operator's Manual. The material provided above is not intended to replace work performed by a Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer. Terms and Conditions apply to all of the information presented on this website. Always be sure to completely read and understand your engine Operator's Manual.

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10.
Where is the Location of the Mod Type and Code number on my Briggs and Stratton engine?

The Model, Type, and Code numbers, stamped directly into the engine, are used to identify our engines. Engines used in lawnmower applications usually have these numbers stamped directly into the blower housing, muffler heat shield, or a few inches above the spark plug. Depending on the style of engine shroud used, the engine numbers may be covered. It may be necessary to remove this shroud in order to locate the Model, Type, and Code.

Many horizontal shaft, overhead valve engines have these numbers stamped into the OHV rocker cover. However, on certain overhead valve powered generators, the equipment manufacturer installs a decorative chrome rocker cover OVER our cover. If your engine has a decorative cover, it may be necessary to remove it in order to locate the Model, Type, and Code.

Please visit our Identify Your Model Number page for help in finding the engine’s numbers. For an explanation of our numbering system, please visit our Numerical Designation System page.

Also, be aware that the numbers found on the Engine Emissions Label can be confused with the engine Model, Type, and Code. Unfortunately, these numbers cannot be used to identify your engine.

Listed below are a number of our most common engines. Click on the image caption links for a more accurate image of the engines' Model, Type, and Code locations.

Please read and abide by any applicable Safety Information contained in your engine Operator's Manual. The material provided above is not intended to replace work performed by a Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer. Terms and Conditions apply to all of the information presented on this website. Always be sure to completely read and understand your engine Operator's Manual.

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11.
Why wont my Briggs and Stratton engine start?

Safety procedures reduce the possibility or accidents and injuries when working on small engines. Before working on your engine, please read our Small Engine Operation Safety FAQ. Generally, an engine requires three things to start - fuel, spark and compression.

Fuel

The most common reason an engine will not start is due to an interruption in fuel delivery to the combustion chamber, usually caused by a restriction in the carburetor. Often, the restriction is caused by stale fuel , or dirt and debris.

Carburetor problems are almost always caused by dirt particles, varnish (stale, old fuel)and other deposits that block the narrow fuel and air passages inside. Gaskets and O-rings are also common sources of problems. Over time they shrink, causing fuel and air leaks that lead to poor engine performance and eventually the engine fails to start at all.

The design of your carburetor depends on the size of the engine and the application. Engines designed for lawn tractors require a precisely tuned carburetor with a choke and idle mixture system. Walk-behind mower engines operate well without these design enhancements.

For a typical example of how an engine may sound when it stalls due to lack of fuel flow, please listen to the following:

Before Removal of Carburetor

When removing the fuel hose (if equipped) from the carburetor on a machine without a fuel shut-off, drain any fuel from the tank first. Do not thread a bolt or cap screw in the removed hose end. Screw threads will damage the hose ID and rubber particles will enter the fuel system. Note position of governor springs, governor link, remote control or other attachments to facilitate re assembly. Do not bend links or stretch springs.

Disassemble carburetor.

Remove all old gaskets, seals and sealing material.

Use commercial carburetor cleaning solvents (such as Briggs & Stratton carburetor cleaner to clean carburetor parts and body.

When cleaning non-metallic parts (plastic, nylon Minlon, etc.) do not leave in commercial carburetor cleaner bath more than 15 minutes. NOTE: Parts containing rubber, such as seals, O-rings, or pump diaphragms should never be placed in commercial carburetor cleaner bath.

Use only compressed air (blowing in both directions) to clean out all openings and passages. NOTE: Do not use wires, drills or any other devices to clean out metering holes or passages.

Make sure the fuel itself is fresh and of the correct type. We recommend the use of clean, fresh, lead-free gasoline with a minimum of 87 octane / 87 AKI (91 RON) is used in our engines. For altitudes above 5,000 feet (1524 meters), a minimum 85 octane / 85 AKI (89 RON) gasoline is acceptable. We also recommend gasoline be purchased in small quantities, not more than a 30 day supply. Fresh gasoline minimizes gum deposits, and also will ensure fuel volatility tailored for the season in which the engine will be operated. Please visit our for tips on handling gasoline.

Also remember a clogged or dirty air filter restricts the amount of air flow to the carburetor. This will cause a rich fuel/air mixture that can flood the engine, or cut the air supply enough that engine will not run. Single-element air cleaners should be replaced every 25 hours (or once a season). In a dual-element system, the pre-cleaner should be replaced every 25 hours. If the engine is operated in especially dusty conditions, the filters may need to be changed more frequently.

Spark

Lack of spark is another common reason an engine will not start. Today's small engines contain a solid-state ignition armature mounted adjacent to the flywheel. The only moving parts in the system are the magnets mounted in the flywheel, which interact with the armature to produce electrical current. The majority of ignition armatures are designed to be replaced, not repaired, if they fail. Most engines built through the early 1980s contain a set of mechanical points, known as breaker points, under the flywheel. The points open and close an electrical circuit required for ignition. Before you replace a suspect ignition armature, always test the ignition with a spark tester (service part number 19368).

Keep in mind that most engines contain one or more stop switches wired between the engine's ignition system and equipment components. You can trigger such a switch by releasing the brake bail or removing the grass discharge unit on a lawnmower, or by standing up from the seat of a lawn tractor, triggering a switch under the seat. These switches cut power to the engine by grounding one of the copper windings in the ignition armature. Also check for faulty electrical switches such as oil safety shut-down, and a tractor's seat and mower deck safety switches.

If spark does not occur look for -

  • Improperly operating interlock system
  • Sheared flywheel key (breaker points only)
  • Incorrect breaker point gap (when so equipped)
  • Dirty or burned breaker points (when so equipped)
  • Breaker plunger stuck or worn (when so equipped)
  • Shorted ground wire (when so equipped)
  • Shorted stop switch (when so equipped)
  • Condenser failure (breaker points only)
  • Incorrect armature air gap
  • Armature failure
  • Worn cam bearings and/or camshaft (breaker points only)

Compression

Inadequate compression, perhaps due to improper valve clearance or a sticking valve, will also prevent your engine from starting. If a compression component such as an exhaust valve leaks during the compression process, there is a decrease in the overall pressure of the charge and a dilution in the concentration of the charge by maverick air. Maverick air is undesirable, unaccounted for air entering the engine through leaks cause by worn, loose, or failed engine components. An exhaust valve leak can result in maverick air entering the combustion chamber through the muffler.

For additional information regarding a no-start condition or poor engine performance, please visit the Troubleshooting section of our website or download our Troubleshooting PDF.

By viewing your engine model's Illustrated Parts List (IPL) you can obtain any engine part numbers you may require. With your engine numbers, please visit our Illustrated Parts List look-up page and enter your Model and Type numbers into the Search Fields located near the top of the page.

The numbers listed next to the part illustrations in our IPLs are called Reference Numbers. These numbers are one to four digits in length depending on the part. The Reference Number is used to locate the specific Service Part Number (usually six digits) you will require for ordering purposes. Most of the IPLs will require that you scroll down past the part illustrations to the pages where the Service Part Numbers are located. The Service Part Numbers are listed in numerical order according to Reference Number.

To purchase parts online, visit our website's Genuine Parts section. This area of our site contains all the engine parts (starter motor, crankshaft, piston, etc.) that are sold directly from Briggs & Stratton.

Parts can also be ordered via phone by calling (800) 444-7774.

A good source for engine specifications and technical servicing information would be a Briggs & Stratton Repair Manual. Please visit our Learning Resources page and enter the Model and Type numbers into the search fields located near the top of the page to view the products available for your engine.

To best determine cause of failure, please consult a local Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer.

Your Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer has all the information relating to Briggs & Stratton warranty information, replacement engines, short blocks, parts, pricing, service/repair, specifications, etc.

For your convenience, we offer three easy ways to locate your nearest Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealers:

Use our website's Service Center Locator.

Visit www.yellowpages.com and enter "Lawn Mowers" or "Engines-Gasoline" in the Category search field and your Postal Code in the Location search field.

Call the Briggs & Stratton Automated Hotline at (800) 444-7774. This hotline is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week and features voice recognition technology to assist you in finding the Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealers in your area. Automated maintenance tips, product information, and FAQs are also offered through voice activated menus.

Please read and abide by any applicable Safety Information contained in your engine Operator's Manual. The material provided above is not intended to replace work performed by a Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer. Terms and Conditions apply to all of the information presented on this website. Always be sure to completely read and understand your engine Operator's Manual.

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12.
What type of gas is good for my engine?

All 4 stroke cycle spark ignited engines

Fuel must meet these requirements:

  • Clean, fresh, unleaded gasoline.
  • A minimum of 87 octane/ 87 AKI (91 RON). High altitude use, see below.
  • Gasoline with up to 10% ethanol (gasohol) or up to 15% MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), is acceptable.

CAUTION: Do not mix oil in gasoline, or modify engine to run on alternate fuels. This will damage the engine components and void the engine warranty.

To protect the fuel system from gum formation, mix in a fuel stabilizer when adding fuel. See Storage section below.

All fuel is not the same. If starting or performance problems occur, change fuel providers or change brands. This engine is certified to operate on gasoline. The emissions control system for this engine is EM (Engine Modifications).

High Altitude
At altitudes over 5,000 feet (1524 meters), a minimum 85 octane / 85 AKI (89 RON) gasoline is acceptable. To remain emissions compliant, high altitude adjustment is required. Operation without this adjustment will cause decreased performance, increased fuel consumption, and increased emissions. See an Authorized Briggs & Stratton Dealer for high altitude adjustment information.

Operation of the engine at altitudes below 2,500 feet (762 meters) with the high altitude kit is not recommended.

All 2 stroke cycle spark ignited engines

Mixing fuel and oil
Always mix a high-quality, 2-cycle oil, such as Briggs & Stratton 2-cycle oil, at 50:1 gasoline to oil ratio.

Fuel must meet these requirements:

  • Clean, fresh, unleaded gasoline.
  • A minimum of 87 octane/87 AKI (91 RON). If operating at high altitude, see below.
  • Gasoline with up to 10% ethanol (gasohol) or up to 15% MTBE (methyl tertiary butyl ether), is acceptable.

CAUTION: Do not use unapproved gasoline such as E85*. Do not modify engine to run on alternate fuels. This will damage the engine components and void the engine warranty.

To protect the fuel system from gum formation, mix in a fuel stabilizer when adding fuel.

See Storage section below.
All fuel is not the same. If starting or performance problems occur, change fuel providers or change brands.

This engine is certified to operate on gasoline. The emissions control system for this engine is EM (Engine Modifications).

High Altitude use
At altitudes over 5,000 feet (1524 meters), a minimum 85 octane / 85 AKI (89 RON) gasoline is acceptable. To remain emissions compliant, high altitude adjustment is required. Operation without this adjustment will cause decreased performance, increased fuel consumption, and increased emissions. See an Authorized Briggs & Stratton Dealer for high altitude adjustment information.

Operation of the engine at altitudes below 2,500 feet (762 meters) with the high altitude kit is not recommended.

Storage

Fuel will become stale when stored over 30 days. Stale fuel causes acid and gum deposits to form in fuel system or on essential carburetor parts. To keep fuel fresh, use Briggs & Stratton FRESH STARTTM fuel stabilizer, available as a Fuel Stabilizer or a drip concentrate cartridge.

There is no need to drain gasoline from the engine if a fuel stabilizer is added according to instructions. Run the engine for 2 minutes to circulate the stabilizer throughout the fuel system. The engine and fuel can then be stored up to 24 months.

If gasoline in the engine has not been treated with a fuel stabilizer, it must be drained into an approved container. Run the engine until it stops from lack of fuel. The use of a fuel stabilizer in the storage container is recommended to maintain freshness. It is also recommended that fuel is purchased in quantities that can be used within 30 days. This will assure fuel freshness and volatility tailored to the season.

*NOTE: Briggs & Stratton engines are not designed to run on E85 fuel. E85 is a blend of 85% ethanol (alcohol) and 15% gasoline, which is not compatible with most engines intended to run on regular gasoline. While alcohol is an excellent octane booster, it delivers less power, having an energy value of only about 77,000 Btu per gallon versus 114,000 Btu for regular gasoline. E85 also demands a different fuel-to-air ratio to burn efficiently, requiring specially calibrated carburetors. Further, specially designed fuel system components are required to withstand the high alcohol concentration found in E85.

For additional information on fuel type, please download our Fuel Requirements PDF.

Please read and abide by any applicable Safety Information contained in your engine Operator's Manual. The material provided above is not intended to replace work performed by a Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer. Terms and Conditions apply to all of the information presented on this website. Always be sure to completely read and understand your engine Operator's Manual.

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13.
Why is bad gas not covered under Warranty?
Fuel will become stale when stored over 30 days. Stale fuel causes acid and gum deposits to form in fuel system or on essential carburetor parts. To keep fuel fresh, use Briggs & Stratton FRESH STARTTM fuel stabilizer
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14.
What is covered in the Briggs & Stratton engine warranty? How long is the warranty period?

Duration of the warranty period would depend on engine Model, type of application, and/or geographic location of engine.

Your engine Operator's Manual details the Briggs & Stratton Engine Owner Warranty Policy.

Examples of What Is Not Covered Items NOT covered under Briggs & Stratton warranty policy include:

  • Problems caused by improper maintenance
  • Problems caused by parts other than original equipment
  • Bent or broken crankshafts
  • Damage due to abuse or neglect
  • Use of improper lubricants
  • Insufficient lubrication
  • Normal wear

Please read and abide by any applicable Safety Information contained in your engine Operator's Manual. This information is not meant to take the place of work performed by a Briggs & Stratton Authorized Dealer. Terms and Conditions apply to all of the information provided on this website. Always be sure to read and understand your engine Operator's Manual.

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15.
What kind of oil do I use in my Briggs engine?

Type of oil to use

  • Use a high quality detergent oil classified "For Service SF, SG, SH, SJ" or higher.
  • Do not use special additives.
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